Wake Up Donkeys

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By NFSC  莲心不染

As the second wave of coronavirus ravaging through the nation’s capital of communist China, Beijing is in a draconian lockdown state as Wuhan a few months ago, a photo of a group of Beijing’s frontline medical workers, exhausted from fighting the coronavirus, lying down in a line resting on the cement ground of an outdoor gym,  has quickly become a meme. Even the popular ethnic Chinese basketball star Jeremy Li, Yao Ming the second, posted the photo on his Weibo site and lauded them saying: Salute to our Medical Workers!

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Picture: Weibo

Yet when I saw this photo, tears welled up my eyes and memory brought me back to my childhood, decades ago in the post Culture Revolution era in China. 

My mother, a beautiful, highly intelligent, energetic medical doctor with a loving and compassionate heart, freshly graduated from the medical school, volunteered herself to the most dangerous job in the hospital, the hepatitis patient quarantine ward, with no adequate PPEs, excessive fatigue and poor nutrition, she soon got infected herself.   As she was young and strong, she quickly recovered and devoted herself as a doctor in the out-patient department of the hospital. During the day, she saw almost a hundred patients a day; at night, she was routinely woken up and called into emergency cases.  Before I reached the age of 10, I became a capable little “housewife”, who could proficiently clean, cook and baby sit my younger sibling as my parents were barely home.

One Chinese New Year Eve, when customarily all family members would gather for a feast to celebrate the fruition of a year’s work, my mother was lying on her bed at home exhausted from her hospital work; while my father, one of the best engineers in his field, was away leading a group of experts working day and night on a secret project for our “great” leader Chairman Mao. As a child living on the hospital cafeteria food, I was so looking forward to a proper Chinese New Year’s dinner and eagerly presented my mother a list of dishes that I had been fancying for the whole year, e.g. sweet-and-sour pork, eight-treasured sticky rice, etc., my once vibrant mother, now languished in her bed responded in a very guilty, apologetic, yet helpless way: “sweetie, mummy is too tired to cook.” Despite their high education and important job roles, my parents’ salaries were not much higher than an ordinary factory worker. After deducting the alimony for all my grandparents, we often ran out of grocery money towards the end of the month.

Years later, when I was applying for my university education, I wrote down one of the best medical schools in China as my top choice. Since my childhood, my mother was my role model and I had determined to become a medical doctor like her, well loved and respected by her patients. Thus, I was totally shocked when my mother pleaded me not to pursue the medical profession.  For the first time, she told me unequivocally: “there is no hope in China as long as the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is in charge. I do not want you to live a life like mine. You should choose a profession which can easily land you a well-paid job in the western countries so that one day you can leave China and live a decent life abroad.” 

Later I found out that my maternal grandfather, who built a successful business from scratch through his years of hard work, had his factory confiscated by CCP and physically tortured in the cruel class struggle sessions as the capitalist exploiting class. My mother and her many siblings suffered starvation when my grandpa’s salary was suspended and faced discrimination in all aspects of their lives for the only crime they had committed, i.e. being born into this world by a capitalist entrepreneur father. One of my aunts died young of tuberculosis as a result of poor nutrition and other aunts and uncles were sent to be re-educated by working as farmers and shepherds in the faraway and sparsely populated border regions of China. Under her gentle smile, my mother’s heart had been bleeding, but she hided all these from me as she did not want to me to grow up under a dark shadow. 

Mr. Miles Guo, the leader of the whistleblower movement, said recently: Chinese people physically are donkeys, mentally are mules. Donkeys wearing blinders circling endlessly propelling the stone mill is a vivid analogue of Chinese people spurred by CCP to work tirelessly until their vitality is used up.  Although medical workers are hailed as white-coat angels by the CCP propaganda, in reality they are treated no better than donkeys. The widely circulating photos of them sleeping on the ground, eating innutritious instant noodles as meals, having their hair shaved off and wearing diaper during work hour are evidences of ill-treatment.  In a stark contrast, in western countries, luxury hotels such as Hilton and Marriott in US, Grand Hotel in Toronto, Claridge’s Hotel in London England, have offered the frontline medical workers in their countries complimentary hotel stay and nutritious meals.  

After decades of brainwash by CCP, many Chinese people’s brains have become barren and sterilized as the mule.  Unbeknownst to many, the Chinese people are enslaved and bounded within the great internet firewall built by the CCP. Moreover, the Chinese people own no land, have no freedom of speech, assembly or election. In China, there are actually two classes of people, the masters, i.e. the CCP leaders, possessing all the powers as well as astronomical amount of wealth around the world through embezzlement and bribery, and the slaves, i.e. the general population, struggling for life.

As Sir Winston Churchill said: The machinery of propaganda may pack their minds with falsehood and deny them truth for many generations of time. But the soul of man thus held in trance or frozen in a long night can be awakened by a spark coming from God knows where, and in a moment the whole structure of lies and oppression is on trial for its life.

Those photos of medical workers should not be upheld as exemplary models for more Chinese to blindly sacrifice their lives for the CCP, those photos should be pinned on the column of shame as evidences of misery and suffering under the ruthless regime of the CCP. Those photos shall become the sparks that awaken the enslaved Chinese people and lead them to shatter the invisible shackles on them. Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our minds!!!

Picture: ETtoday
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